Fiscal Note & Local Impact Statement

125 th General Assembly of Ohio

Ohio Legislative Service Commission

77 South High Street, 9th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215-6136 ² Phone: (614) 466-3615

² Internet Web Site: http://www.lsc.state.oh.us/

BILL:

Sub. H.B. 106

DATE:

February 17, 2004

STATUS:

As Passed by the House

SPONSOR:

Rep. Williams

LOCAL IMPACT STATEMENT REQUIRED:

No —

Minimal cost

 


CONTENTS:

Requires the Department of Youth Services upon request to release certain records pertaining to a child discharged or released from its custody to the school district in which the child is entitled to attend school and specifies that a school district’s policy on the assignment of students to an alternative school may provide for the assignment of any child released from the custody of the Department of Youth Services to such a school

 

State Fiscal Highlights

 

STATE FUND

FY 2004

FY 2005

FUTURE YEARS

General Revenue Fund

     Revenues

- 0 -

- 0 -

- 0 -

     Expenditures

Minimal increase

Minimal increase

Minimal annual increase

Note:  The state fiscal year is July 1 through June 30.  For example, FY 2004 is July 1, 2003 – June 30, 2004.

 

·        Department of Youth Services (DYS).  For calendar year 2001, DYS reports that it released or discharged 2,449 individuals from its custody, the majority of whom would have sought admission to their resident school district.  This would suggest that, as a result of the bill, DYS could be copying and transmitting certain records of over 2,000 individuals annually to various school districts around the state.  As of this writing, DYS anticipates that the annual cost associated with this records release duty will be no more than minimal, which, for the purposes of this fiscal analysis, means an estimated cost of less than $100,000 per year for the state.

Local Fiscal Highlights

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

FY 2004

FY 2005

FUTURE YEARS

School Districts

     Revenues

- 0 -

- 0 -

- 0 -

     Expenditures

Increase, likely to be no more than minimal

Increase, likely to be no more than minimal

Increase, likely to be no more than minimal annually

Note:  For most local governments, the fiscal year is the calendar year.  The school district fiscal year is July 1 through June 30.

 

·        School districts.  As of this writing, it does not appear that the requirement that a school district request and review the records of certain students prior to assigning those students to an appropriate school will create more than a minimal ongoing administrative responsibility.  Keeping in mind that the bill permits and does not require the assignment of certain students to alternative schools, the annual expenditures of some school districts may increase from what the level of expenditures might otherwise have been under current law and practice, but the magnitude of any such increase seems unlikely to exceed minimal annually.  For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, minimal means an estimated annual cost of no more $5,000 for any school district with an average daily membership (ADM) of 1,000 or more, or an estimated annual cost of no more than $1,000 for any school district with an ADM of less than 1,000.

 


 

 

Detailed Fiscal Analysis

 

Provisions of the bill

 

For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, the bill most notably:

 

·        Requires the superintendent of a school district to make a written request to the Department of Youth Services (DYS) to provide certain records prior to admitting a student who has been discharged or released from the Department’s custody.

·        Requires DYS to provide those records within 14 days of such a request from a superintendent of a school district.

·        Requires the school psychologist to whom those records are released to review those records and make a recommendation to the superintendent of the school district as to the appropriate assignment of the child to a school in the district, which may include an alternative school.

 

State and local fiscal effects

 

Expenditures

 

As a result of the bill, the annual expenditures of two entities – the Department of Youth Services and school districts – will or may be affected, as described in the paragraphs immediately below.

 

(1) Department of Youth Services 

 

It appears that the most notable administrative burden created by the bill will fall on DYS in the form of ongoing, annual costs associated with the copying and transmission of certain records of a child released or discharged from DYS custody to a specified school psychologist working for the child’s intended resident school district. 

 

The records required to be released include:  (1) the child’s individualized education program, if such a program has been developed for the child, and (2) the unified case plan and clinical services summary developed for the child by the staff of the DYS institution where the child resided.

 

For calendar year 2001, DYS has reported that it released or discharged 2,449 individuals from its custody, the majority of whom would have sought admission to their resident school district.  This would suggest that, as a result of the bill, DYS could be copying certain records for over 2,000 individuals annually and then transmitting those copied records to various school districts around the state.  As of this writing, DYS anticipates that the annual cost associated with providing these records will be no more than minimal.  For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, minimal means an estimated cost of less than $100,000 per year for the state.

 

(2) School districts

 

As of this writing, it does not appear that the requirement that a school district request and review the records of certain students prior to assigning those students to an appropriate school will create more than a minimal ongoing administrative responsibility.

 

In the matter of alternative schools, under current law, school district boards of education are authorized to establish alternative schools and certain school district boards of education – the Big-Eight School Districts and districts with significantly substandard graduation rates – are required to establish at least one alternative school.  The purpose of such schools is to serve certain students, for example, those on suspension, having truancy problems, a history of classroom disruption, experiencing academic failure, or exhibiting other academic or behavioral problems.  It seems likely to be the case that the cost per student is higher in an alternative school than would typically be the case in a more traditional school. 

 

The bill adds to the list of students who may be assigned to an alternative school those who have been discharged or released from the custody of DYS.  It appears, however, that in many cases such students may already be assigned to alternative schools, as delinquency is often accompanied by the types of difficulties for which children can be assigned to alternative schools under current law.  As a result, LSC fiscal staff does not anticipate that adding such students to the list of students who may be assigned to an alternative school will trigger a noticeable rise in the number of students assigned to an alternative school. 

 

Thus, keeping in mind that the bill permits and does not require the assignment of such students to alternative schools, the annual expenditures of some school districts may increase from what the level of expenditures might otherwise have been under current law and practice, but the magnitude of any such increase seems unlikely to exceed minimal annually.  For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, minimal means an estimated annual cost of no more $5,000 for any school district with an average daily membership (ADM) of 1,000 or more, or an estimated annual cost of no more than $1,000 for any school district with an ADM of less than 1,000.

 

Revenues

 

The bill will not directly affect revenues of the state and its political subdivisions.

 

 

 

LSC fiscal staff:  Laura A. Potts, Budget Analyst

 

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