Fiscal Note & Local Impact Statement

126 th General Assembly of Ohio

Ohio Legislative Service Commission

77 South High Street, 9th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215-6136 Phone: (614) 466-3615

Internet Web Site: http://www.lsc.state.oh.us/

BILL:

Sub. H.B. 4

DATE:

May 9, 2005

STATUS:

As Reported by House Criminal Justice

SPONSOR:

Rep. Dolan

LOCAL IMPACT STATEMENT REQUIRED:

No

Permissive

 


CONTENTS:

Creates the Ohio Incident-Based Reporting System (OIBRS) in the Office of Criminal Justice Services and requires that law enforcement agencies that receive certain types of funding participate in the system, in the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program, or in the Ohio Local Law Enforcement Information Sharing Network

 

State Fiscal Highlights

 

STATE FUND

FY 2006

FY 2007

FUTURE YEARS

General Revenue Fund (GRF)

Revenues

 

- 0 -

- 0 -

Expenditures

Potential minimal increase

Potential minimal increase

Potential minimal increase

Justice Programs Fund (Federal Fund 3L5)

Revenues

Potential gain in federal program grant moneys

Potential gain in federal program grant moneys

Potential gain in federal program grant moneys

Expenditures

Potential increase, commensurate with potential gain in

federal grant moneys

Potential increase, commensurate with potential gain in

federal grant moneys

Potential increase, commensurate with

potential gain in

federal grant moneys

General Services Fund (Fund 4P6)

Revenues

Up to $171,500

potential gain

Up to $171,500

potential gain

Up to $171,500

potential annual gain

Expenditures

Potential increase, commensurate with

revenue gain

Potential increase, commensurate with

revenue gain

Potential increase, commensurate with

revenue gain

Note: The state fiscal year is July 1 through June 30. For example, FY 2006 is July 1, 2005FY 2006 is July 1, 2005 June 30, 2006.June 30, 2006.

 

        Office of Criminal Justice Services' expenditures. According to the Office of Criminal Justice Services, if, as a result of the bill, more law enforcement agencies participate in OIBRS, it would not dramatically increase the Office's workload or costs, as the reporting system is automated for the user to enter data into the system. Assuming that were true, then, as of this writing, the potential additional annual operating expenses resulting from an increase in OIBRS participation appears unlikely to exceed minimal, with some portion of any such costs perhaps being covered by federal funds. For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, a minimal cost increase to the Office of Criminal Justice Services means less than $100,000 annually.

        Fund 4P6. Each law enforcement agency participating in OIBRS is required to pay the Office of Criminal Justice Services a $350 annual software fee, with all such fees deposited to the credit of the Office's General Services Fund (Fund 4P6). If all 490 law enforcement agencies not reporting to either OIBRS or UCR, as a result of the bill, decide to participate by submitting data to OIBRS, then Fund 4P6 could gain as much as $171,500 in the form of annual software fees ($350 fee x 490 not reporting law enforcement agencies).

        Federal criminal justice funds. The amount of federal criminal justice services funding that the state receives annually, mostly through recently enacted Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program, is a function of population and crime rates. Theoretically, if Ohio increases its reporting rate, and thus a more accurate representation of its crime rate, then the amount of federal funding that Ohio would qualify for and draw down annually could increase. The Office of Criminal Justice Services has estimated that the lack of full reporting cost the state as much as $2 million in 2005 federal JAG program funds. Presumably, if the Office had more federal dollars to award, then more grant moneys would be distributed to various state and local law enforcement agencies. Annually, the Office distributes over 90% of its funding directly to local government units. The actual amount, however, will also be a function of the magnitude of the federal moneys available.

 

Local Fiscal Highlights

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

FY 2005

FY 2006

FUTURE YEARS

Counties, Municipalities, and Townships

Revenues

Potential gain of federal project grant funds

Potential gain of federal project grant funds

Potential gain of federal project grant funds

Expenditures

(1) Potential increase associated with gain of federal project grant funds; (2) Potential increase associated with crime reporting duties

(1) Potential increase associated with gain of federal project grant funds; (2) Potential increase associated with crime reporting duties

Potential increase

associated with gain of

federal project grant funds;

(2) Potential increase associated with crime reporting duties

Note: For most local governments, the fiscal year is the calendar year. The school district fiscal year is July 1 through June 30.

 

        Reporting costs. Each law enforcement agency participating in OIBRS is required to pay the Office of Criminal Justice Services a $350 annual software fee. From the Office's perspective, although a nominal annual OIBRS fee is assessed, the participating law enforcement agency also receives the benefit of a paperless records management system that allows it to manage offense reports, arrests, citations, property room items, and investigator notes. The Office also provides technical assistance free-of-charge.

        Federal funds. Theoretically, if Ohio increases its reporting rate, and thus a more accurate representation of its crime rate, then the amount of federal funding that Ohio would qualify for and draw down annually could increase. Presumably, if the Office had more federal dollars to award, then more grant moneys would be distributed to local law enforcement agencies. Annually, the Office distributes over 90% of its funding directly to local government units. The actual amount, however, will also be a function of the magnitude of the federal moneys available.


 


 

 

Detailed Fiscal Analysis

 

Provisions of the bill

 

For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, the bill most notably:

 

        Requires the state's Office of Criminal Justice Services to develop and maintain the Ohio Incident-Based Reporting System (OIBRS).

        Requires every law enforcement agency receiving federal criminal justice grants or state criminal justice system GRF moneys through the Office to participate in OIBRS the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, or, subject to certain conditions being met, the Ohio Local Law Enforcement Information Sharing Network.

 

Two related features of the bill should also be noted. First, the bill does not require that a law enforcement agency participate in OIBRS, the FBI's UCR Program, or the Ohio Local Law Enforcement Information Sharing Network. The only requirement is that, if such a law enforcement agency wants to be eligible for certain state or federal moneys, it must participate in one of these three information systems. Such participation, however, does not guarantee funding for a law enforcement agency as those funds are awarded through a competitive grant process. Second, if more law enforcement agencies participate in OIBRS or the UCR Program, then the state potentially qualifies for increased federal criminal justice services funding.

 

Crime reporting systems

 

UCR. The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program was conceived in 1929 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police to meet a need for reliable, uniform crime statistics for the nation. In 1930, the FBI was tasked with collecting, publishing, and archiving those statistics. The UCR Program is summary-based reporting that involves a manual method of reporting limited crime statistics. Data are collected on eight major crime categories: murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Ohio law enforcement agencies participating in summary-based reporting submit hard copies of their statistics directly to the FBI.

 

OIBRS. Ohio's Incident-Based Reporting System (OIBRS) is a voluntary program developed in the later 1980s and administered by the Office of Criminal Justice Services that allows Ohio law enforcement agencies to submit crime statistics directly to Ohio and the FBI in an automated format. In OIBRS, information describing each reported crime or arrest is submitted as part of a unit record with its own incident number. Each unit record contains information on up to ten offenses that occurred during an incident. Also included is detailed information on property, victims, offenders, and arrestees. This allows for the unique preservation of the details and relationships of each incident.

 

Along with processing monthly crime data from Ohio law enforcement, the Office provides training and assists agencies with automating their records and reporting process.

 

Ohio Local Law Enforcement Information-Sharing Network. The Ohio Local Law Enforcement Information-Sharing Network (OLLEISN) is a new statewide program, funded by federal homeland security dollars, that allows law enforcement agencies to electronically share information and data. It is a joint effort between the Attorney General, the Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police, and the Ohio Department of Public Safety, including the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Twenty-three agencies are participating in the start-up phase of the program; all of them currently participate in either OIBRS or the UCR Program.

 

Participation. Table 1 displays a summary of Ohio law enforcement agency crime reporting status data extracted from the OIBRS web site as follows: (1) the number and percentage of law enforcement agencies that report to either OIBRS, UCR, or are not submitting data to either system, (2) the total population located within each of those three reporting categories, and (3) the percentage that each of those populations is of the total Ohio population.

 

Table 1
OIBRS and UCR Crime Reporting Status*

Type of Reporting

Number of

Law Enforcement Agencies Reporting

Percent of

Law Enforcement Agencies Reporting

Ohio's Population by Reporting Status

Percent of Ohio's Total Population

OIBRS

252

26%

5,984,078

52%

UCR

219

23%

3,325,804

29%

Not Reporting

490

51%

2,097,149

18%

*Crime reporting status data as of May 9, 2005.

State fiscal effects

 

Expenditures

 

It appears that the Office of Criminal Justice Services' current annual operating expenses related to maintaining OIBRS totals around $200,000 or so. The sources of that funding involve a mix of federal moneys (around 57% of the total), OIBRS participation fee revenues (around 26% of the total), and GRF appropriations (around 17%). According to the Office of Criminal Justice Services, if, as a result of the bill, more law enforcement agencies participate in OIBRS, it would not dramatically increase the Office's workload or costs, as the reporting system is automated for the user to enter data into the system. Assuming that were true, then, as of this writing, the potential additional annual operating expenses resulting from an increase in OIBRS participation appears unlikely to exceed minimal, with some portion of any such costs perhaps being covered by federal funds. For the purposes of this fiscal analysis, a minimal cost increase to the Office of Criminal Justice Services means less than $100,000 annually.

 

Revenues

 

OIBRS annual software fee. Each law enforcement agency participating in OIBRS is required to pay the Office of Criminal Justice Services a $350 annual software fee, with all such fees deposited to the credit of the Office's General Services Fund (Fund 4P6). If all 490 law enforcement agencies not reporting to either OIBRS or UCR, as a result of the bill, decide to participate by submitting data to OIBRS, then Fund 4P6 could gain as much as $171,500 in the form of annual software fees ($350 fee x 490 not reporting law enforcement agencies).

 

Federal criminal justice funds. The amount of federal criminal justice services funding that the state receives annually, mostly through recently enacted Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program, is a function of population and crime rates. Theoretically, if Ohio increases its reporting rate, and thus a more accurate representation of its crime rate, then the amount of federal funding that Ohio would qualify for and draw down annually could increase. The Office of Criminal Justice Services has estimated that the lack of full reporting cost the state as much as $2 million in 2005 federal JAG program funds. Presumably, if the Office had more federal dollars to award, then more grant moneys would be distributed to various state and local law enforcement agencies. Annually, the Office distributes over 90% of its funding directly to local government units. The actual amount, however, will also be a function of the magnitude of the federal moneys available.

 

Local fiscal effects

 

Expenditures

 

Each law enforcement agency participating in OIBRS is required to pay the Office of Criminal Justice Services a $350 annual software fee. From the Office's perspective, although a nominal annual OIBRS fee is assessed, the participating law enforcement agency also receives the benefit of a paperless records management system that allows it to manage offense reports, arrests, citations, property room items, and investigator notes. The Office also provides technical assistance free-of-charge.

 

Revenues

 

Theoretically, if Ohio increases its reporting rate, and thus a more accurate representation of its crime rate, then the amount of federal funding that Ohio would qualify for and draw down annually could increase. Presumably, if the Office had more federal dollars to award, then more grant moneys would be distributed to local law enforcement agencies. Annually, the Office distributes over 90% of its funding directly to local government units. The actual amount, however, will also be a function of the magnitude of the federal moneys available.

 

 

LSC fiscal staff: Holly Wilson, Budget Analyst

 

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