Fiscal Note & Local Impact Statement

126 th General Assembly of Ohio

Ohio Legislative Service Commission

77 South High Street, 9th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215-6136 Phone: (614) 466-3615

Internet Web Site: http://www.lsc.state.oh.us/

BILL:

H.B. 296

DATE:

January 9, 2006

STATUS:

As Passed by the House

SPONSOR:

Rep. Buehrer

LOCAL IMPACT STATEMENT REQUIRED:

No

No local cost

 


CONTENTS:

To provide for the issuance of apprentice hunting licenses and apprentice fur taker permits

 

State Fiscal Highlights

 

STATE FUND

FY 2006

FY 2007

FUTURE YEARS

Division of Wildlife Conservation Fund (Fund 015)

Revenues

Potential gain dependent on sales

Potential gain dependent on sales

Potential gain dependent on sales

Expenditures

Minimal increase in administrative costs

Minimal increase in administrative costs

Minimal increase in administrative costs

Wetlands Habitat Fund (Fund 816)

Revenues

Potential gain dependent on sales

Potential gain dependent on sales

Potential gain dependent on sales

Expenditures

- 0 -

- 0 -

- 0 -

Note: The state fiscal year is July 1 through June 30. For example, FY 2006 is July 1, 2005 June 30, 2006.

 

        The bill allows individuals to obtain apprentice hunting licenses and/or apprentice fur taking permits. Fees for these licenses and permits will be the same as regular hunting license fees and fur taking permit fees. Any revenue gain from the issuance of apprentice licenses and permits will be dependent on sales. Currently, an estimate of potential sales is unknown. All revenues from the sale of licenses and permits will be deposited into the Division of Wildlife Conservation Fund (Fund 015).

        If an apprentice wishes to hunt wild ducks, geese, or other waterfowl, he or she must also purchase a wetland habitat stamp. Revenue from wetland habitat stamps will be deposited into the Wetlands Habitat Fund (Fund 816).

Local Fiscal Highlights

 

        No direct fiscal effect on political subdivisions.


 


 

 

Detailed Fiscal Analysis

 

The bill authorizes the issuance of apprentice hunting licenses and apprentice fur taker permits and exempts applicants for those licenses and permits from completing hunting or trapping education courses. 

 

The bill also includes language that increases the age of youth hunting licenses and youth fur taker permits from under 16 years of age to under 18 years of age. However, this change was actually made in Am. Sub. H.B. 66 (the main appropriations bill), but since the bill was drafted prior to the enactment of Am. Sub. H.B. 66, the language is included in H.B. 296. There was a projected loss of $352,000 resulting from this provision. This fiscal analysis will not discuss the provisions related to youth hunting licenses and youth fur taker permits.

 

Background

 

Currently, Ohio residents or nonresidents desiring to hunt a wild bird or wild quadruped, or trap a fur-bearing animal, are required to obtain resident or nonresident hunting licenses and/or fur taking permits. If over 18 years of age, resident hunting licenses are $19 and nonresident hunting licenses are generally $125; resident fur taker permits are $8 and nonresident fur taker permits are $15. If under 18 years of age, applicants are required to obtain a youth hunting license or youth fur taker permit for a fee of $10 or $7, respectively.

 

In addition to procuring a hunting license and fur taker permit, depending on the type of game a person plans to hunt, regardless of whether he/she is a resident or nonresident, the person may also be required to obtain either an adult or youth special deer permit ($24 A/$12 Y), urban deer permit ($15 adult only), spring turkey permit ($24 A/$12 Y), fall spring turkey permit ($24 A/$12 Y), Ohio Wetlands Stamp ($15 both), and a Federal Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp ($15 both).

 

Also as part of the licensing and permitting process an applicant is required to show completion of a hunter or trapper education course.

 

Apprentice Hunting Licenses and Permits

 

The bill allows residents and nonresidents to obtain apprentice hunting licenses and apprentice fur taker permits. The bill only allows an individual to purchase three apprentice licenses or permits, after which the person must purchase a regular license or permit if desired. While hunting or trapping, an apprentice must be accompanied by another person who is 21 years of age or older and who possesses a valid hunting license. The fees for adult and youth apprentice licenses, permits, and stamp fees, will be the same as adult and youth regular licenses, permits, and stamp fees described above. Furthermore, applicants for apprentice licenses and permits will not be required to complete hunter or trapper education courses before they obtain their apprentice license or permit.

 


Fiscal Impact on the Department of Natural Resources

 

The Department of Natural Resources anticipates the issuance of apprentice licenses and permits, as well as the exemption for hunter education courses, will encourage individuals with limited hunting or trapping experience to buy regular licenses and permits in the future, thus potentially increasing license and permit revenues. Currently, the Department does not have an estimate of the potential gain in revenue from the issuance of apprentice hunting licenses, if any, or an estimate of future revenue from such individuals ultimately purchasing a regular license or permit. All revenues will be dependent on the sale of licenses and permits. Also, since hunter education courses are currently free, the exemption for apprentice licenses and permits would have no fiscal impact.

 

As far as additional expenditures, the Department may experience minimal expenditure increases to adopt rules necessary to administer the issuance of apprentice hunting licenses and apprentice fur taker permits, develop the apprentice hunting licenses, distribute these licenses to local vendors, and provide additional wildlife law enforcement. The Department indicates any additional costs will be covered with currently budgeted appropriations.

 

Any potential increase in revenues or expenditures will affect the Division of Wildlife Conservation Fund (Fund 015) and the Wetlands Habitat Fund (Fund 816). The Wildlife Conservation Fund (Fund 015) receives hunting and fishing license fee revenue to support the operations of the Division of Wildlife. The Wetlands Habitat Fund (Fund 816) receives revenue from the Ohio Wetlands Stamp Fee. The Ohio Wetlands Stamp Fee is required for hunting wild ducks, geese, or waterfowl. Sixty percent of the money in Fund 816 is used by the Division of Wildlife for the acquisition, development, management, and preservation of waterfowl areas in the state. The remaining 40% is granted to nonprofit groups for projects that provide habitats in Canada for waterfowl with migration routes across Ohio.

 

 

LSC fiscal staff: Jonathan Lee, Senior Analyst

 

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